Still Life Drawing Techniques

Still Life Drawing Techniques

This live class was held on September 5, 2020. Various still life techniques were the focus of this class. From composition, to value structure, to texture this class covered it.

We also talked to the importance of starting with thumbnails. To see the live stream chat, I would suggest watching this video on YouTube.

 

 

 

Jinny’s Sketchbook – Incredible Diversity

Jinny’s Sketchbook – Incredible Diversity

Jinny kind of flies under the radar in class, she is super quiet. However, her art work is certainly not quiet at all. Jinny is super talented, she experiments with many diverse styles of art. In my opinion, this is what every first year student should do.

Jinny is the type of student that will, out of the blue, shock you with an incredible life drawing in class. It’s so cool flipping through her sketchbook, you are not sure what to expect next. It’s amazing to see how many styles she is flirting with.

Jinny is certainly using first year of college to find her style. I’m not sure if she will land on one particular style, and that is okay. She can pull that off.

There are so many drawings in Jinny’s sketchbook that I can just sit with and enjoy. I hope you will do the same.

 

 

Check out Jinny’s Instagram. Thanks again Jinny for sharing your art.

 

Under-Drawing Critique – Avoiding Overwhelm

Under-Drawing Critique – Avoiding Overwhelm

Arjun recently uploaded an under-drawing for a critique over in the members area of Drawing Tutorials Online. He mentioned in the comment section of the post that he was feeling a bit overwhelmed with starting.

There is so much to think about when starting to draw the figure for an under-drawing. Proportions, gesture, anatomy as well as light and shade are just a few techniques to consider. I can see where an artist can become overwhelmed, especially when trying to do their best work.

What I do my best to show in this short little video, is a sequence of techniques. Where I like to start, as well as secondary options for starting. I also talk to the importance of using continuous line towards the end of the video.

Also, Arjun was using blind contour, I recommeded using blind contour for just a short period of time, like two seconds. I would save the pure blind contour for a longer thirty-second exercise.

 

 

Check out Arjun’s Instagram. Thanks again Arjun for sharing your art.

 

The Four Boxes Technique

The Four Boxes Technique

Jan recently posted up this portrait drawing for a critique. It was from my Shea Portrait course. Jan is looking to get a likeness when drawing a portrait.

Being able to get a likeness is difficult. Sometimes a student will need to use many diverse techniques. Some techniques click with certain students while others do not. You will need to experiment with multiple techniques until you find the one that works for you.

In this video, I share with Jan the Four Boxes Technique. It’s pretty simple. First, you should draw the exact size of your photo reference frame. So if your reference is 8 x 10 inches, draw an 8 x 10-inch boarder on your piece of paper.

You will need to split the frame vertically down the middle, then across the middle. This will leave you with four boxes. You then draw what is in each box. Nothing earth -shattering here.

this is just a drawing technique that will help you look at drawing a portrait differently. Again, this is just an exercise. This four boxes technique just give you a different perspective on drawing correct proportions.

Thanks so much, Jan for sharing your artwork in DTO’s member critique gallery. 

 

 

If you are looking to get your artwork critique definitely check out Drawing Tutorials Online. I offer member critiques every Monday. If you are looking for a more in-depth approach to having your artwork critique read more about my one to one coaching.

 

How To Draw The Structure Of The Eye

How To Draw The Structure Of The Eye

I recently completed a portrait drawing course that focuses on how to draw the features of the face. In this particular drawing lesson, I share with you two different ways to think about drawing the eye.

The first way to think about the eye is basically drawing a ball in a socket. Do your best to visualize light hitting a sphere. That sphere is sitting in a socket, the eye socket of the skull. I love drawing with outlines, however, too many artists focus on the linear aspect of the eye’s lashes.

Instead, try drawing shapes of light and dark. Those shapes of light and dark with be dictated by which direction the light is hitting the ball in the socket.

Another way to think about the eye is with surface planes. The master of surface planes is certainly George Bridgeman. I never like my surface plane type drawings. However, they are a necessary evil when learning how to draw the eye. Try your hand at completing a surface plane drawing of the eye.

Lastly, in this short lesson, I also share with you what not to do when drawing the eye. You do not want to draw the eye in the form of an almond shape. You do not want to draw super sharp eyelashes, instead, think of grouping the lashes together in a soft shape.

Lastly do not draw the iris as a full-round circle. The round iris is usually covered up by both eyelids making it look more like a rounded rectangle.

This drawing lesson basically provides you with two exercises to complete. These exercises will help you to think about how to draw the structure of the eye.

Thank you so much for watching.

 

 

Learn more on how a membership to Drawing Tutorials Online can help you with your portrait drawings.