How To Draw The Eye

How To Draw The Eye

I recently completed a course titled How To Draw The Features Of The Face. In this new course, I break down the features of the face in a step by step process. I cover how to draw the eyes, nose, and lips.

I wanted to share this particular lesson with you because it is short and to the point. You really want to draw the eye in a loose, curvy organic sort of way. You do not want to incorporate any straight lines when drawing the eye, everything about the eye should look rough and organic.

As you can see in this rough sketch of the eye I did not really focus too much of my time on the lashes. Do your very best to draw along with me, avoiding the lashes for now. Think more about the structure of the eye, not the lashes.

When drawing the lashes do not draw them with straight lines, instead, try to group all of the lashes into a shape.

I’m really happy with the way this course turned out. It’s really helping people improve their portrait drawings.

Download the Photo reference.

 

 

Thank you so much for watching the drawing lesson above. If you are interested in seeing the rest of the course consider a membership to Drawing Tutorials Online. Not only will you gain access to this course and many more, but, you will also be able to get feedback on your portrait drawings in our member critique gallery.

 

John Singer Sargent Study – Member Critique

John Singer Sargent Study – Member Critique

Arjun is a current member of Drawing Tutorials Online. Not only is Arjun a member but he contributes to the site on a weekly basis. His questions always stir up great conversations. 

He is always working at his craft of digital painting using Procreate. Arjun also signed up for my One Month Coaching where he really jump-started his progress. Arjun is a tireless artist devoting countless hours into improving his technique.

Arjun utilizes the member critique gallery on a weekly basis which is part of his weekly ritual for constant improvement. In this digital portrait painting, Arjun worked on a study of Lady Agnew of Lochnaw painted by John Singer Sargent in 1892.

Studying the great masters is a great way to learn. In this critique, I share with Arjun the importance of seeing shapes of value. These shapes represent the different surface planes on Lady Agnew’s face. The key takeaway from this critique is how to see the shapes of value, then shading them in their appropriate value.

One of the most important jobs of the portrait painter is to shade shapes in a sold way. If you have the time I would suggest working on a study of Lady Agnew the same way Arjun did. Do your best to squint to see the different values placed around the face. It will certainly help you to improve your portrait painting.

 

 

Check out Arjun’s website. Thanks again Arjun for sharing your art.

 

Beautiful Statues to Draw

Beautiful Statues to Draw

Tomorrow I will be teaching a figure drawing class at the Metropolitan Museum Of Art without a figure drawing model. Instead we will be drawing from some really amazing statues.

I’ve been drawing at the Met since I was in college. I used to go there once a month to draw both paintings and sculptures. If you do not have access to a traditonal life drawing class, drawing statues and paintings at a Museum is a great substitute.

Life drawing is great whether it’s from a live model or from a statue created hundreds of years ago. I encourgae you to get to a museum this Summer and draw. Don’t concern yourself with that nosy art critic looking over your shoulder, just have fun.

As you know I’m teaching small group classes at the Met this Summer. For those of you who cannot join me I’d like to offer you a free PDF download that contains some pretty amazing sculpture. Use it to practice this weekend.

There is something amazing that happens when you draw from beautiful art. 

 

 

I currently have three classes scheduled this Summer. If you are looking for something different to do, you can learn more at MatthewArchambault.com

 

How To Draw The Nose

How To Draw The Nose

I just recently uploaded a brand new portrait drawing course in the member’s area of Drawing Tutorials Online.

This new course focuses on short sketchy type drawings that teach you how to draw the features of the face. Most of the video range about ten to fifteen minutes each. They are super easy to get through.

This lessons seven showcases how to draw the nose from the three-quarter view. This video tutorial will show what to do and what not to do when it comes to drawing the nose. No, this video is not about drawing a finished polished drawing, instead, it’s about teaching how to see structure.

This video will teach you how to utilize form lines to promote a three-dimensional look and feel to the nose. You will learn how to see and use tone on the diverse surface planes.

As mentioned above this video towards the end, will show you what not to do. The one thing you do not want to do is make the nostril super dark. Especially in a pencil drawing. Using your darkest dark for the nostril will create a keyhole effect in your drawing.

That said enjoy the lesson. Definitely try your own version of the drawings.

 

 

 

 

If you would like to sign up to gain access to the entire course today, check out our membership options. This course primarily covers how to draw the features of the face.

I’m teaching small group drawing classes at the Metropolitan Museum Of Art this  Summer. You can read more about them at my personal site, Matthew Archambault.

 

Jasper’s Sketchbooks

Jasper’s Sketchbooks

Jasper was a student enrolled in my foundation drawing class at the School of Visual Arts. The semester has now come to a close and I am certainly going to miss the class.

Jasper, in particular, was truly such a great student to have in class. His life drawings were spectacular for a first-year student. We could have just filmed Jasper’s life drawing pad and I think we really should have. I will save that project for next semester.

Looking through Jasper’s sketchbooks is certainly inspiring. I truly love everything about them. The color, line, texture, and attention to detail.

What I love most about looking through Jasper’s sketchbooks in the boldness of just diving into a drawing. I hope you take some inspiration from his sketchbooks today.

 

 

Check out Jasper’s Instagram. Thanks again Jasper for sharing your art.